Introducing Pete

Here is our newest team member Pete on Dough, Bread, and his role at Well Kneaded. He is a fully trained Professional Chef who has worked at some of the most exciting food establishments around the world (Spring, The Nordic Food Labs, Tartine... to mention just a few.) but he is not the type to blow his own trumpet... over to Pete:

'What’s your role within Well Kneaded?

I have been taken on by Well Kneaded for the summer of ’16 to fill some of the void left by the great Chris McCullagh.  My job remit includes but is not limited to: In-house Sparky (in-training), Dough Boy and Van Driver. The deal is until September and our agents are working on the details of the second album.

Photo by Deborah Panes

Photo by Deborah Panes

What did you do before Well Kneaded?

I have mainly been found in the kitchen of various food businesses in London. In 2014, after helping a good friend Claude Compton get his first restaurant off the ground, ‘Claude’s Kitchen’, I spent six months out, working for some chefs and bakers in California and Copenhagen. Highlights were Tartine Bakery in San Francisco, and the Nordic Food Lab, the food research project set-up by the noma guys.

What do you see yourself doing in five years time?

There is some unfinished business with 'Canvas Bread', the bakery I started quite soon after getting back from my trip.

Whats your favourite thing about working with dough?

The transformation of a scrappy heap consisting of flour and water, into this smooth and fragrant mass is pleasing every time. 

Photo by Deborah Panes

Photo by Deborah Panes

What’s the difference between working with dough for bread and dough for pizza?

Sourdough bread and sourdough pizza are very similar, made of the same three ingredients: flour, water, salt. But pizza dough has a longer fermentation period (resting), that we do at a cooler temperature (3-5c).  It also has a little less water, and is usually more forgiving: with great bread you want to be gentle, keeping pockets of air throughout the dough as you take it through the different stages so your final loaf is not too dense. With pizza this is less important as the heat of the oven, around 500c, can transform even the smallest holes into something extraordinary. And, though pizza dough is more forgiving in the first part, I have been humbled at the skill required in spinning the bases at the final stage, and at the speed required on the van: hats off to the pizzaiolo! 

photo by Deborah Panes

photo by Deborah Panes

A word from Bridget at WK HQ on Pete : Pete is one of those people who balances excellence and vision with attention to detail - a quite unusual combination. Nothing is too much work for him it seems, and he knows what it is to get stuck in with the crazy spectrum of demands that a start up has.  Pete's cheffing experience and expertise with all things doughy are a serious asset - this man's got capacity and we can't wait to use more of it especially as we look to open our first Bricks n' Mortar place.